Learning in new dimensions

Eagle Hill School

Eagle Hill School educates students with learning (dis)abilities by providing a community that honors the individual with a deep commitment to the idea that difference is the norm. ARC’s design concept for the STEM+ Building is emblematic of EHS pedagogy where education diversity and three-dimensional learning are fostered.

Natural rhythms and campus circulation paths were supported by siting the building on existing desire lines to draw students into the building and promote active engagement, direct connections to learning spaces and an abundance of natural daylight and views to foster a sense of connection with the campus and rural landscape.

Presentation Mode
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Classroom

The classroom reimagined:

ARC sought to craft flexible spaces to support students’ unique constellation of talents, and the belief that learning is about making connections – physical, intellectual, and emotional.

 

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social stair at EHS
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Window detail

ARC brought a level of creativity and innovation to the project that was essential to the outcomes that were achieved.

Michael Riendeau, Assistant Head of School for Academic Affairs, Eagle Hill School

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Connecting Core Space

Connecting core spaces with core concepts

In respect to the diversity of learning styles, breakout spaces of varying scales were introduced to support personal reflection, as well as large and small collaborative group activity. The team emphasized the experience of moving through the building to encourage active engagement between students where double-height spaces at building entries provide direct and transparent visual connections to draw students up and through the building. The strategy was not simply to incorporate a viewing space from the corridor, but to create interior vistas that are engaging for people on both sides of each wall. In some cases, from a single vantage point, the activities of as many as eight individual spaces can all be experienced simultaneously. 

 

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Student spaces
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Space

The building became a three-dimensional expression that students have the opportunity to live and learn in ways unique to them.

Jan Taylor, ARC

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Library

The library commons embodies the three-dimensional concept - a central core within a distributed multi-level library format, with spacing and meeting areas to further opportunities for connection.

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Gateway

A gateway and a gathering space

ARC was also careful to consider the STEM Center’s connection to the rest of the school. Situated at the heart of campus, it is now the most desirable path between dormitories, dining commons, and student union, and natural foot traffic contributes significantly to the experience of the environment.

 

This [Mobius strip] concept exemplifies the value of dialogue and an iterative process between the client and the team.

Victor Agran, ARC

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Mobius Strip

The development of the new Math Core was emblematic of the collaborative dialogue between EHS and the team and the multi-dimensional formation of the building program. The group began to reconsider the idea of a conventional whiteboard, and from this seed, evolved the concept of a physical Mobius strip; a three-dimensional math principle that would become a collaborative thinking space. This vision evolved into an Artist in Residence project developed with EHS students and is exemplary of the value of dialogue, an iterative design process, and to further the strategy of creating an environment that nurtures connections and cross-pollination of ideas – what the Eagle Hill School defines as “the adjacent possible.”

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Social stair from the top

Students at the center

Buildings are first and foremost places for people, and the PJM STEM Center was designed to support students’ physical, intellectual and emotional well-being above all else. By supporting Eagle Hill’s high-quality instruction and positive, inclusive program, it provides a vital foundation for students to become reflective problem solvers, innovators, and community members.

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Students at the Center
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EHS_HardwickMA_BSA6 cropped
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Phtography: Jeff Goldberg/Esto Photography

Project
PJM STEM+ Center at Eagle Hill School
Location
Hardwick, MA
Size
39,300 SF
Awards
2021 The Chicago Athenaeum, American Architecture Award
2020 AIA/Boston Society of Architects Design Awards, K – 12 Education Facilities Design Award

Learning in new dimensions

Eagle Hill School

Project
PJM STEM+ Center at Eagle Hill School
Location
Hardwick, MA
Size
39,300 SF
Awards
2021 The Chicago Athenaeum, American Architecture Award
2020 AIA/Boston Society of Architects Design Awards, K – 12 Education Facilities Design Award
Eagle Hill School educates students with learning (dis)abilities by providing a community that honors the individual with a deep commitment to the idea that difference is the norm. ARC’s design concept for the STEM+ Building is emblematic of EHS pedagogy where education diversity and three-dimensional learning are fostered.

Natural rhythms and campus circulation paths were supported by siting the building on existing desire lines to draw students into the building and promote active engagement, direct connections to learning spaces and an abundance of natural daylight and views to foster a sense of connection with the campus and rural landscape.

Presentation Mode
Image
Classroom

The classroom reimagined:

ARC sought to craft flexible spaces to support students’ unique constellation of talents, and the belief that learning is about making connections – physical, intellectual, and emotional.

 

Image
social stair at EHS
Image
Window detail

ARC brought a level of creativity and innovation to the project that was essential to the outcomes that were achieved.

Michael Riendeau, Assistant Head of School for Academic Affairs, Eagle Hill School

Image
Connecting Core Space

Connecting core spaces with core concepts

In respect to the diversity of learning styles, breakout spaces of varying scales were introduced to support personal reflection, as well as large and small collaborative group activity. The team emphasized the experience of moving through the building to encourage active engagement between students where double-height spaces at building entries provide direct and transparent visual connections to draw students up and through the building. The strategy was not simply to incorporate a viewing space from the corridor, but to create interior vistas that are engaging for people on both sides of each wall. In some cases, from a single vantage point, the activities of as many as eight individual spaces can all be experienced simultaneously. 

 

Image
Student spaces
Image
Space

The building became a three-dimensional expression that students have the opportunity to live and learn in ways unique to them.

Jan Taylor, ARC

Image
Library

The library commons embodies the three-dimensional concept - a central core within a distributed multi-level library format, with spacing and meeting areas to further opportunities for connection.

Image
Gateway

A gateway and a gathering space

ARC was also careful to consider the STEM Center’s connection to the rest of the school. Situated at the heart of campus, it is now the most desirable path between dormitories, dining commons, and student union, and natural foot traffic contributes significantly to the experience of the environment.

 

This [Mobius strip] concept exemplifies the value of dialogue and an iterative process between the client and the team.

Victor Agran, ARC

Image
Mobius Strip

The development of the new Math Core was emblematic of the collaborative dialogue between EHS and the team and the multi-dimensional formation of the building program. The group began to reconsider the idea of a conventional whiteboard, and from this seed, evolved the concept of a physical Mobius strip; a three-dimensional math principle that would become a collaborative thinking space. This vision evolved into an Artist in Residence project developed with EHS students and is exemplary of the value of dialogue, an iterative design process, and to further the strategy of creating an environment that nurtures connections and cross-pollination of ideas – what the Eagle Hill School defines as “the adjacent possible.”

Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA Cropped
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA2 Cropped.jpg
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA_15.jpg
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA_152.jpg
Image
Social stair from the top

Students at the center

Buildings are first and foremost places for people, and the PJM STEM Center was designed to support students’ physical, intellectual and emotional well-being above all else. By supporting Eagle Hill’s high-quality instruction and positive, inclusive program, it provides a vital foundation for students to become reflective problem solvers, innovators, and community members.

Image
Students at the Center
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA6 cropped
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA3 Cropped
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA5 Cropped
Image
EHS_HardwickMA_BSA4 Cropped

Phtography: Jeff Goldberg/Esto Photography

Learning in new dimensions / Eagle Hill School
social stair at EHS
Mobius Strip
Window detail
Social stair from the top
Students at the Center
Connecting Core Space
Student spaces
Space
Library
Classroom
Gateway