Development and discovery at Fort Devens

Bristol Myers Squibb

Bristol Myers Squibb’s (BMS) Biologics Development Building (BDB) is an important addition to the company’s growing Deven’s campus, reinforcing synergy and connection among its various scientific teams. Opened in 2015 and expanded to accommodate further growth in 2019, the BDB links to an existing lab/office and manufacturing building via pedestrian bridge connectors, creating a thriving new campus hub for interaction and collaboration.
Presentation Mode
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Green light

With sustainability as a central goal, the facility was sited to maximize beneficial solar exposure, allowing for an abundance of natural light throughout the space, as well as minimal energy consumption. Glass partitions at the labs and high ceilings with reflective light shelves in  offices allow light to reach deep into the building, allowing for exterior views  from most occupied spaces. The BDB has received Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Silver certification for energy and environmental design.

Biologics are increasingly important in the treatment of serious diseases, and a rapidly growing part of our company’s pipeline of potential new therapies.

Lou Schmukler, Executive Vice President and President, Global Product Development & Supply, Bristol Myers Squibb

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Collaborative to the core

Flooded with natural light and interconnected by central stairways, vertical collaborative cores situated between each lab sector provide a visual connection on all three floors, and physically link two floors to each other, and promote further interaction. The building’s circulation design requires scientists to pass through the collaboration zones to reach different lab sectors, further connecting teams on a daily basis.

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Meeting spaces that meet needs

A variety of conference and huddle rooms - each configured with glazed acoustic panel finishes, white board surfaces, and demountable partition wall systems - are dispersed throughout each collaboration zone. Glass walls provide sightlines throughout the space, while breakout areas and lounges serve as casual and formal gathering spaces for impromptu meetings and discussions among scientists.

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Workspace connection

Thinking beyond the traditional office-area layout, ARC developed a more interactive workspace design to facilitate maximum collaboration between researchers. In three major lab sectors, perimeter workstation zones utilize open office furnishings that also incorporate small group tables to promote immediate team collaboration. With the workstation zones placed opposite their associated labs, teams have direct access to the labs as well as constant contact between colleagues and co-workers.

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HORNER_19098_091_lab blur

Bringing together biologics development and clinical and commercial manufacturing on one campus will help accelerate innovative medicines for patients worldwide.

Lou Schmukler, Executive Vice President and President, Global Product Development & Supply Bristol Myers Squibb

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HORNER_19098_147_People

The BDB is located at Bristol Myers Squibb’s Devens Campus, a former U.S. Army post that served as a training and staging facility during World Wars I and II. 

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HORNER_16037_121_v3

-20%

Reduction in lighting-related energy use enabled by energy-efficient fixtures and sensors (compared to a national baseline building of similar function)

7

Varieties of cold-hardy perennials, watered with captured condensation from mechanical equipment, make up a green wall that brings biodiversity to the site

1+ mile

of sun shading devices incorporated in exterior glazing block solar heat gain during the summer but allow low-angled light and heat during the winter

Image
HORNER_19098_132_1000x704

Installing a green roof on major portions of the roof improves on-site air quality and further reduces the heat island effect.

Photography: John Horner Photography 

Project
Biologics Development Building at Bristol Myers Squibb
Location
Devens, MA
Size
228,000 SF
Awards
2017 ISPE’s Facility of the Year

Development and discovery at Fort Devens

Bristol Myers Squibb

Project
Biologics Development Building at Bristol Myers Squibb
Location
Devens, MA
Size
228,000 SF
Awards
2017 ISPE’s Facility of the Year
Bristol Myers Squibb’s (BMS) Biologics Development Building (BDB) is an important addition to the company’s growing Deven’s campus, reinforcing synergy and connection among its various scientific teams. Opened in 2015 and expanded to accommodate further growth in 2019, the BDB links to an existing lab/office and manufacturing building via pedestrian bridge connectors, creating a thriving new campus hub for interaction and collaboration.
Presentation Mode
Image
HORNER_16037_082

Green light

With sustainability as a central goal, the facility was sited to maximize beneficial solar exposure, allowing for an abundance of natural light throughout the space, as well as minimal energy consumption. Glass partitions at the labs and high ceilings with reflective light shelves in  offices allow light to reach deep into the building, allowing for exterior views  from most occupied spaces. The BDB has received Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Silver certification for energy and environmental design.

Biologics are increasingly important in the treatment of serious diseases, and a rapidly growing part of our company’s pipeline of potential new therapies.

Lou Schmukler, Executive Vice President and President, Global Product Development & Supply, Bristol Myers Squibb

Image
HORNER_19098_052_People_1000x70

Collaborative to the core

Flooded with natural light and interconnected by central stairways, vertical collaborative cores situated between each lab sector provide a visual connection on all three floors, and physically link two floors to each other, and promote further interaction. The building’s circulation design requires scientists to pass through the collaboration zones to reach different lab sectors, further connecting teams on a daily basis.

Image
HORNER_16037_15
Image
HORNER_16037_074B

Meeting spaces that meet needs

A variety of conference and huddle rooms - each configured with glazed acoustic panel finishes, white board surfaces, and demountable partition wall systems - are dispersed throughout each collaboration zone. Glass walls provide sightlines throughout the space, while breakout areas and lounges serve as casual and formal gathering spaces for impromptu meetings and discussions among scientists.

Image
HORNER_19098_073_People_1000x704
Image
HORNER_16037_136_v3

Workspace connection

Thinking beyond the traditional office-area layout, ARC developed a more interactive workspace design to facilitate maximum collaboration between researchers. In three major lab sectors, perimeter workstation zones utilize open office furnishings that also incorporate small group tables to promote immediate team collaboration. With the workstation zones placed opposite their associated labs, teams have direct access to the labs as well as constant contact between colleagues and co-workers.

Image
HORNER_19098_091_lab blur

Bringing together biologics development and clinical and commercial manufacturing on one campus will help accelerate innovative medicines for patients worldwide.

Lou Schmukler, Executive Vice President and President, Global Product Development & Supply Bristol Myers Squibb

Image
HORNER_19098_147_People

The BDB is located at Bristol Myers Squibb’s Devens Campus, a former U.S. Army post that served as a training and staging facility during World Wars I and II. 

Image
HORNER_16037_121_v3

-20%

Reduction in lighting-related energy use enabled by energy-efficient fixtures and sensors (compared to a national baseline building of similar function)

7

Varieties of cold-hardy perennials, watered with captured condensation from mechanical equipment, make up a green wall that brings biodiversity to the site

1+ mile

of sun shading devices incorporated in exterior glazing block solar heat gain during the summer but allow low-angled light and heat during the winter

Image
HORNER_19098_132_1000x704

Installing a green roof on major portions of the roof improves on-site air quality and further reduces the heat island effect.

Photography: John Horner Photography 

Development and discovery at Fort Devens / Bristol Myers Squibb
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HORNER_19098_073_People_1000x704
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HORNER_19098_091_lab blur
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HORNER_16037_121_v3
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